The art of Sushi and the discipline of the Gospel

Jiro Ono is a 94 year old owner of the famous Sukiyabashi Jiro, a tiny 3-Michelin star sushi restaurant based in Tokyo. Ono is perhaps one of the most best sushi chefs in the world apparently, Barack Obama was said to have commented “That’s some good sushi right there”, referring to Ono’s skill.

What people do not know about Ono is that his accomplishment did not come as a moment of fluke discovery. It took years of honing himself through innovative methods in preparation and his rigorous approach in training aspiring chefs.

How long does it take for an apprentice to even earn the privilege to work on a dish to be served? Well, about 10 years. That’s a lot of grunt work. Yes, and it includes, by the way, massaging a raw octopus for the first nine months as a trainee. In case you were wondering, no – that is the octopus first and perhaps last enjoyment because only through hand massage can the tough meat be made tender for guests.

After all that hard training, guess what? Mastering that art of octopus massage only earns a trainee the privilege of cooking the rice. A few more hundred hours of cooking the rice leads to earning the next level privilege of making egg sushi. Just in case you were thinking that you cannot go wrong with making egg sushi, Ono has apparently dumped the dish of one of his apprentices 200 times into the trash before he found that apprentice’s work acceptable enough to make it at the dinner table of guests.

No prizes for guessing the drop out rate of this programme. And why so? Because it is human nature to want to skip to be known for something than it is to put in grind work.

The transformation of God in our lives requires us to humble ourselves and stick to the programme. It is that very process that primes us for breakthroughs.

How are you submitting to His transformation process today?